Late Night Shopping in Shenzhen (3 of 6)

As I began to uncover in my last post with the electronics markets, the retail scene and shopping experience is perhaps one of China’s most remarkable differences when compared with North America. Large multinational store brands such as Walmart have begun to operate in recent years, but a lot of shopping is still done in “markets” and small mom-and-pop shops that are clustered by the dozens all over the city. This is true even for Shenzhen which is such a new city. Continue reading

Huaqiangbei Electronics Market (Shenzhen 2 of 6)

Shenzhen is one of the most important centres in the world for electronics manufacturing. There are many factories in the city producing your favourite electronic devices, along with copies of those devices.

The Huaqiangbei district of Shenzhen is home to many electronics markets which span several floors and several buildings. These markets are places for locals to buy their electronics as well as wholesalers and resellers to buy components in bulk. To a North American, these markets are somewhat comparable a flea market, except for electronics.

Competition in these markets is high, and was actually quite intimidating for me. Upon entering or approaching most booths, the staff will seemingly swarm around you, and watch your every move quietly, ready to answer questions, or make a sale. I prefer a bit more distance between me and the sales staff as I try to shop, particularly if I am just browsing for nothing in particular. Continue reading

Shekou and the Bay of Shenzhen, China (1 of 6)

I recently travelled to Shenzhen on the south coast of China for a 3 week business trip. This is my third visit to Asia, and my first to China.

Shenzhen is now one of the most built up cities in the world, and currently has a population of 8 million. Before 1979, Shenzhen was merely a small village of 30,000 people, so nearly everything that exists in Shenzhen has been constructed in less than 4 decades. The city’s rapid growth was made possible by foreign investments following the establishment of the Shenzhen Economic Zone in 1979. Continue reading

Red Mile after Calgary Flames eliminate Vancouver

See also my photos from Tuesday, May 5th: Red Mile after Flames win against Ducks

On Saturday night, the Calgary Flames won game 6 at home in the Scotiabank Saddledome against the Vancouver Canucks, eliminating them. Following the game, thousands of fans flooded 17th Avenue recreating the infamous Red Mile, a term first coined for the strip back in 2004 when the Flames nearly won the Stanley Cup. The city and police have smartly chosen to manage the street party without restricting it. They closed down the street to cars entirely, allowing fans to flood the bars and party in the street. This lasted for hours.

In Vancouver, a surprise display of fireworks lit the sky moments the final buzzer of the game went off. Even the Olympic Cauldron was lit! Apparently, the fireworks were for a private event, not to actually celebrate the elimination of the Canucks from the cup. Many Flames fans found the very unfortunate timing quite hilarious.

I live only a few blocks from 17th, so I joined the street party with my camera. I’m no hockey expert, but during playoffs, nearly all Calgarians become Flames fans.

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