8 days

I leave for France next Wednesday. The number of days before I go can now counted on two hands, which is something I clearly do all the time. My boss and I went to The Source today to buy a power adapter for my work laptop. It’s an interesting little device that’ll work in many countries, and has all the different plugs on it.

 

It’s that time of year again when I get out my Lego to work on while I watch TV. Here’s what I have so far. Think I’ll get anything worth seeing completed before I go?

I know these details may seem mundane, but hey, I’m still getting used to my blogging software.

Locally, an article in the newspaper discusses how Paul Zed is using the analogy of a car engine to discuss the region’s progress with the engine roaring ahead now, after running “clear in reverse” a few years ago. Pushing the gas pedal are new “developments” like a new oil refinery, Canaport LNG, new call centres and department store expansions. Clearly, the main engine which Mr. Zed describes is running on Irving gasoline, and the whole vehicle is being driven to wherever the Irving Empire wants us to go. Forgive my pessimism, but I don’t really believe that things like a new Wal-Mart or more call centres are something that are really going to define the city in a more positive way. These things may give us more jobs, but jobs alone don’t make the area more exciting and don’t really encourage many people to pull up stakes and move here.

In world news, I think the hanging of Saddam is a good thing. I heard the comments of some people opposed to capital punishment and also people who feel that hanging is a rather barbaric method. I have to disagree with all of them. In cases where authorities are absolutely sure that someone abused power to intentionally cause death of innocent civilians, I think capital punishment is appropriate in order to ensure that the person never has a chance to do it again. It also gives closure to all those who may come to fear such a person. As for death by hanging, it’s quick, clean and cheap. I wish those who fuss about this would instead stand up for the rights of the innocent and those who cannot defend themselves, before they cry for people like Saddam and other criminals.

If you agree or disagree with me, don’t hesitate to leave a comment. It’s the only way I’ll know if anyone else cares or not.

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6 thoughts on “8 days”

  1. Paul, I just realized what you are going to miss the most while you are gone, and as shocking as it is, it’s not me. It’s your precious Lego World!!!

  2. Here’s my issue with capital punishment: Killing one person is bad. Killing thousands of people (or ordering them killed) is also horrible. Does killing the person who has killed others not put us on the same level as the killer? Or is it in fact natural to kill others who hinder the growth of the human condition? I ask this, because many species of animals kill one another, altering in some way the growth of the species.

  3. Hey thanks for the comments.

    Killing someone like Saddam does not put us on the same level as him. We killed a dangerous killer. He killed a bunch of innocent people. There’s a huge difference in personalities there. I disagree with anyone who can clearly label some action as always bad or always good. Clearly, it is possible to imagine appropriate and inappropriate circumstances for every action possible by humans. It’s never black and white.

  4. L
    Hereâ??s my issue with capital punishment: Killing one person is bad. Killing thousands of people (or ordering them killed) is also horrible. Does killing the person who has killed others not put us on the same level as the killer?

    I disagree. We didn’t kill Saddam. A jury of his peers was gathered (Half from each of the different prominent sects of Muslims in Iraq) and determines that it was best that he be put to death. We did no killing. His peers decided that it was in the best interest of the world that he no longer live.

    Paul, nice site by the way. Nice use of WordPress in the format of your website. Unlike my monstrosity of a website where it is all dynamically driven by a database query. I hate my site! Gr

  5. Dear Paul,

    Nice topic choice. It’s a beefy one. Everyone will forever have a comment. While I’m not necessarily sure how I feel about capital punishment, I do agree this was the best choice for the situation at hand.

    The reason why I am torn on the subject is because I favor the idea of someone paying for their sins and killing them is sometimes an easy way out. How will someone suffer if they are no longer around to think about what they have done, in confinement, for the rest of their lives. However, in some places, Canada specifically, criminals are often released pre-maturely due to various reasons. The idea of this applying to Saddam is frightening and therefore, killing him and preventing him from the ability to murder more innocent victims was definitely necessary.

    He was a radical leader with no morals and having him sit in jail would accomplish nothing as he would never feel remorse for his actions. Killing him was necessary to the members of the families he has destroyed. If Harper ran around killing members of my family, I would want to see him killed. It is easy to sit on the outside where we have been unaffected and place our ideas and opinions on others. We may think Hanging is barbaric, but if we look around we’ll realize we’re in C-A-N-A-D-A and it doesn’t take a genius to realize we have an entirely different culture, and way of life, when in comparison to the middle east. So while hanging seems harsh in our country, we need to accept that it is still common in their’s.

    T’is all.

    P.S – Paul, you best keep in touch and continue to debate with me when you are in France 😉
    xoxox

  6. I got carried away with Saddam, but I also meant to discuss Saint John’s growth through Call Center’s…

    I am opposed!! As an employee of Wyndham Worldwide Canada (the new name for Cendant) I must say having our city comprised of Call Center’s is a horrible way to create job’s for our residents. I say this because although you require a high school diploma in order to work at one (to prevent drop outs from avoiding getting their G.E.D) they are a simple solution for quick cash. Many people have decided to make a career out of the high paying facilities as opposed to continuing on to post-secondary education.

    While my employee does offer tuition reimbursement for up to 2k a calender year, many more of my peer’s are finding it easier to just settle down into the 9-5, 9-13/hr job instead of furthering their education for a better career in the future.

    Also, these call centers are goal oriented to the extreme. They are high-stress, high-call volume facilities that suck the sole out of individuals. I believe if more people chose call center jobs we would find our hospitality equivalently to those of New York City… and from just having been there, this would been a horrible fate. We need to get rid of Call Centers, we are better than that. Surely we can find better ways to employ our residents. I realize New Brunswick is frustrated with young graduates leaving to broader horizon’s by the ship load, but call center’s are just a way to keep us here, uneducated and unhappy!

    … 🙂

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